Wandering Thoughts archives

2024-04-18

On the duration of self-signed TLS (website) certificates

We recently got some hardware that has a networked management interface, which in today's world means it has a web server and further, this web server does HTTPS. Naturally, it has a self-signed TLS certificate (one it apparently generated on startup). For reasons beyond the scope of this entry we decided that we wanted to monitor this web server interface to make sure it was answering. This got me curious about how long the duration of its self-signed TLS certificate was, which turns out to be one year. I find myself not sure how I feel about this.

On the one hand, it is a little bit inconvenient for us that the expiry time isn't much longer. Our standard monitoring collects the TLS certificate expiry times of TLS certificates we encounter and we generate alerts for impending TLS certificate expiry, so if we don't do something special for this hardware, in a year or so we'll be robotically alerting that these self signed TLS certificates are about to 'expire'.

On the other hand, browsers don't actually care about the nominal expiry date of self-signed certificates; either your browser trusts them (because you told it to) or it doesn't, and the TLS certificate 'expiring' won't change this (or at most will make your browser ask you again if you want to trust the TLS certificate). We have server IPMIs with self-signed HTTPS TLS certificates that expired in 2020, and I've never noticed when I talked to them. Also, it's possible that (some) modern browsers will be upset with long-duration self-signed TLS certificates in the same way that they limit the duration of regular website TLS certificates. I haven't actually generated a long duration self-signed TLS certificate to test.

(It's possible that we'll want to talk to a HTTP API on these management interfaces with non-browser tools. However, since expired TLS certificates are probably very common on this sort of management interface, I suspect that the relevant tools also don't care that a self-signed TLS certificate is expired.)

I'm probably not going to do anything to the actual devices, although I suspect I could prepare and upload a long duration self-signed certificate if I wanted to. I will hopefully remember to fix our alerts to exclude these TLS certificates before this time next year.

PS: The other problem with long duration self-signed TLS certificates is that even if browsers accept them today, maybe they won't be so happy with them in a year or three. The landscape of what browsers will accept is steadily changing, although perhaps someday it will reach a steady state.

web/TLSSelfSignedCertsDuration written at 23:15:36; Add Comment


Page tools: See As Normal.
Search:
Login: Password:
Atom Syndication: Recent Pages, Recent Comments.

This dinky wiki is brought to you by the Insane Hackers Guild, Python sub-branch.